First Light® flower essence No 81 Tanekaha – The essence that brings joy forward

 

Tanekaha is one of the Plant essences of the First Light Flower essences. This means it is a plant connected to a soul lesson: the soul lesson of joy.

What is joy?
Joy comes from the Old French word ‘joie’ and it means ‘feeling of pleasure and delight’.
How do we find joy in life? How do we express joy?
These questions have been unravelling themselves to me over the last years and I can say that finding joy is now a daily practice in my life. Something that is worth making time for, whereas before I have often skipped over this thinking there was no time for it in my day. There are always many moments of joy waiting for us in the day, like unexplored little gems, if we pay attention to them and give them importance.
Recognising joy in my day has become  an important practice, and sometimes it means I have to give my attention fully to a moment where I otherwise would have skipped over. It also means that a leaf, a flower, the sunlight at a certain angle can have me mesmerised for a minute to many more.
Finding joy has become a dot to dot painting for me in the day as my joy connects me with my being alive and my reason to be here.

Joy shines a light on things and makes it unique. Including ourselves. Connecting with your joy in life is bringing your own uniqueness forward and letting it shine out in the world abundantly.

Tanekaha is a flower essence that helps us find these moments. Next to that it can be used in various ways, it lifts our soul and connects it straight back in with our spirit. As it has a childlike innocence it is a beautiful essence for children to help them keep their connection with their own true self. Equally, it is a wonderful essence for adults to connect with their childlike or true essence and give joy its rightful place back in our lives.

Tanekaha – for connection to your inner joy and uniqueness, for letting your inner child shine.

✵ Flower essence information sourced from “The Sacred Plant Medicine of Aotearoa, Volume One.” by Franchelle Ofsoske-Wyber.